THE GANGSTERS ALL HERE Live Tweet movie for Sat., Sept. 19: KISS TOMORROW GOODBYE (1950)

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First off, please note the new time for The Gangsters All Here Live Tweet. We’ve switched from 12 noon over to 2:30 p.m. EST on Saturdays, just before #SatMat. So enjoy a hearty lunch, and then join us for some gangster grittiness!

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Secondly, we’re switching to our new time slot in style with 1950’s Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye. This movie is so perfect for our Live Tweet, this week we’re not even bothering with a review. Instead, we’re only going to list the movie’s highlights.

A Warner Bros. gangster picture! Starring James Cagney at his sociopathic best! And Barbara Peyton at her masochistic lowest! With crooked cops! Sleazy lawyers! An outrageous body count! And an intro with a richly glorified cameo from William Frawley just before he hit it big with I Love Lucy!

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You have to ask? On a scale of 1 to 5 fannies, this movie gets a solid numero_5. You won’t want to move from your seat for this one. Believe us, once Cagney & Co. get your nerves pulsating, the only part of you that won’t be moving will be your butt!

Follow our Twitter page @BMovieBoss, use the hashtag #GangstersAllHere to comment on the movie while it’s running, and your Saturday afternoon will be off to a bang! See you at 2:30 p.m. EST this Saturday!

Guest-hosting a #BNoirDetour Live Tweet double feature on Sun., Sept. 13

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Holy maloney, when did I die and go to film-noir heaven? I’m as giddy as Richard Widmark pushing a wheelchair-bound woman down the stairs!

For this Sunday, the film-noir blog BNoirDetour is letting me completely handle her usual Sunday Twitter.com presentation of noir movies. She kindly let me co-host about a month ago, but this is the first time she’s given me the whole she-bang to handle. Don’t worry, though, I’m giving you a couple of memorable flicks to finish off your weekend!

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My first choice is a particularly earthy number from 1955 titled Murder Is My Beat. It stars Paul Langton as Ray Patrick, a police detective who is aboard a train to accompany Eden Lane (Barbara Payton), a convicted murderess, to prison to carry out her sentence. But during a brief layover, Eden happens to look out the window — and wouldn’t you know it, she sees the very man whom she has been convicted of murdering. Once Eden convinces Ray of this, it’s Ray’s minor task to convince the rest of the world that Eden is telling the truth.

This sounds about as far-out as noir gets, but it’s riveting all the way, in no small part to the bare-bones direction of Edgar G. Ulmer, director of the almost existential noir classic Detour. And I gotta admit, I’m a pushover for buxom blondes — and if somebody like Eden told me she’d just seen Bigfoot outside her window, I’d probably do all I could to prove her right, so I can relate to Ray’s plight.

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My second entry for the evening is 1948’s Cry of the City, starring Victor Mature as Lt. Candella, a seen-it-all cop who’s trying to nail high-profile gangster Martin Rome (Richard Conte, The Big Combo) for a jewel robbery that Rome won’t cop to. The movie starts out as a lively game of cat-and-mouse, but with a tough-as-nails screenplay by an uncredited Ben Hecht, and taut direction from noir veteran Richard Siodmak (Criss Cross), the movie evolves into an unforgettable character study of both sides of the law. This might seem a strange description, but this movie is as beautiful as film noir gets.

Join us on Twitter.com at 9 p.m. EST on Sun., Sept. 13; if you’re looking for an “anchor” Twitter account, go to mine (@MovieMovieBlogB). (If you don’t usually “follow” me on Twitter, be sure to add me so that I can read your Live Tweet comments. You can always “unfollow” me after the double feature.) Use the hashtag #BNoirDetour to follow the movies and comment on them whenever you’d like, and have a BNoir blast with us!

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POSTSCRIPT. I — Movie Movie Blog Blog, that is — would like to take this opportunity to invite the regular viewers of #BNoirDetour to follow The Gangsters All Here, my Twitter page devoted to my Saturday Live Tweets of classic-era gangster movies. If you like film-noir, you are sure to enjoy my selection of films featuring fedora, fast talkers, and Feds!

Just click on the above banner to go to my The Gangsters All Here Twitter page. Then, every Saturday at 2:30 p.m. EST, join us for a great gangster movie, and use the hashtag #GangstersAllHere to comment on the movie with your fellow Twitterers. And if you want a heads-up on the week’s movie selection, click here to visit my blog devoted to this same Live Tweet. Enjoy the movies, you mugs!

(My enthusiastic thanks goes out to Salome at BNoirDetour for letting me take over her “director’s chair” this week!)

I'm so happy!

I’m so happy!

Addicted to the Live Tweet

As you can probably tell by some of my recent blog posts, I’m getting quite obsessed with movie-based Live Tweets on Twitter.com. (In fact, I now “run” one of my own and am the third wheel on another one.) I have come to the conclusion that, between these Tweets of YouTube and other online-based movies, and Turner Classic Movies on cable, I could happily watch new (for me) movies in my man-cave and never visit a real movie theater again for the rest of my life.

In any case, if you’ve been curious about these Live Tweets, below is the latest schedule of them — there’s literally something for every day of the week. In addition to movies, there are tweets devoted to old TV shows such as “Star Trek” and “Dark Shadows.” And most of the movies and shows referenced on these Tweets are available for viewing on YouTube or elsewhere online for free. It’s a fun habit to get caught up in!

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THE GANGSTERS ALL HERE Live Tweet movie for Sat., Sept. 5: Steve McQueen in THE (GREAT) ST. LOUIS BANK ROBBERY (1959)

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I’m afraid I just can’t resist star power. This week’s movie features Steve McQueen in an early role.

Inexplicably, the movie is titled The Great St. Louis Bank Robbery in all of its advertising, even though the movie’s credits insist that the title is simply The St. Louis Bank Robbery. My guess is that the movie couldn’t conjure up enough attention or business with its original title, so they added the word Great to make it sound more prestigious. (In any case, once you view the movie, you’ll see that the word “great” is quite the misnomer in this instance.)

McQueen plays George, a college drop-out. (The movie makes this character trait explicit by having George walk around in his former letterman’s jacket throughout the movie’s first half.) George is coerced by his ex-girlfriend’s brother Gino into being the getaway driver for a bank heist that is being planned by the head of Gino’s gang. Along the way, there’s bad dialogue and acting, a smattering of homoeroticism, and an obnoxious pseudo-pop background song that would have been better used on “Sesame Street.”

The movie was based on an actual 1953 St. Louis bank robbery. The film’s makers made much of the fact that many of the police officers and local citizens who were involved in the robbery reenacted their parts in the movie. (This explains some of the amateurish acting in the movie’s climax but not the rest of the film.)

(Useless trivia: According to the Internet Movie Database, this movie has recently been remade with an updated story and re-titled American Heist, starring Adrien Brody and Star Wars’ Hayden Christiansen. It was to have been released this past July but has yet to see the light of an American movie screen.)

Join us at Twitter.com on Saturday at noon, if you know what’s good for you! https://twitter.com/BMovieBoss  #GangstersAllHere

THE GANGSTERS ALL HERE at Twitter.com, Sat., Aug. 29 at 12 noon EST – Our “debut” movie: Walter Matthau’s GANGSTER STORY

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Now that I’ve had a taste of Live Tweeting to old movies, I’m thoroughly addicted. So starting this Saturday, Aug. 29, I’m going to host a weekly Live Tweet on Twitter.com. It’s titled The Gangsters All Here and will be devoted to the kinds of gangster movies that only Ed Wood would have been proud to write and direct.

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To keep things simple for this Twitter debut, I’m going with a 1959 movie that’s generically titled Gangster Story. However, you’ll quickly find that it’s anything but routine. Its star and director is none other than Walter Matthau — yes, that Walter Matthau — who reportedly took the directing-acting gig on a dare. Based on the evidence of the final film, it’s a good thing nobody ever dared Matthau to jump off a cliff.

Matthau plays a down-on-his-luck escaped criminal who pulls off a bank heist when he’s desperate for money. The strange thing is how easily he pulls off a bank job that’s so elementary, he makes Woody Allen in Take the Money and Run look like a Mafioso.

The oddities don’t end there. Matthau cast his real-life wife, Carol Bruce, as a shy librarian who inexplicably falls for Matthau when he makes small talk with her in the library one day while trying to escape some hoods who are after him. And the movie’s pseudo-swanky theme song is written by Leonard Barr, whom TV viewers of a certain age (mine, sadly) will remember as a very abrasive comedian who often guested on “The Dean Martin Show” (primarily because he was Martin’s cousin).

Anyway, if you’d like to join the gang(sters) this Saturday, join me at my Twitter page, @MovieMovieBlogB at 12 noon EST. I will provide a link for you to watch the movie online for free via YouTube. If you want to comment about the movie at any point during its viewing, just use the hashtag #GangstersAllHere. I look forward to seeing you there!

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Guest-hosting a Live Tweet double feature with #BNoirDetour on Sun., Aug. 23

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The film-noir blog BNoirDetour hosts a Live Tweet of a noir movie at Twitter.com every Sunday night starting at 9:00 p.m. EST. This Sunday, she has graciously allowed me to join her in Tweeting a movie of my choice after she Tweets hers.

BNoirDetour starts the party at 9 p.m. with The Shanghai Gesture (1941). It takes place in a Shanghai casino where the lives of the casino’s dragon-lady boss, a privileged young woman (Gene Tierney of Laura), a gigolo (Victor Mature), and a wealthy Englishman (Walter Huston) converge. As the movie is directed by Josef von Sternberg, who did his best to turn cinema into the Shrine of Marlene Dietrich, you have no reason to believe that this movie will be low-key in any way.

This movie will be followed by my choice and one of my favorite recent film-noir viewings, Behind Green Lights (1946). It stars the very likable William Gargan as a police lieutenant who does his level best to keep control of the many goings-on during the night shift at his police station. This includes a woman suspected of murder (Carole Landis), whom the lieutenant would like to avoid arresting because it would make the corrupt editor of the city newspaper all too happy. (Look closely at the actor playing the editor. He’s Roy Roberts, 20 years prior to gaining sitcom fame as Mr. Cheever, Mr. Mooney’s dyspeptic boss on “The Lucy Show”!)

To join our noir nosh, just log onto Twitter and type @BNoirDetour to get to the main host’s Twitter page for either the 9:00 or the 10:45 show, or type @MovieMovieBlogB to get to my Twitter page for just the 10:45 show. Either way, you’ll get a free link to each movie via YouTube. When you are instructed at the given time, just click on the start of the movie and follow along. No matter which movie you view, if you want to post comments about each movie while it’s running, use the hashtag #BNoirDetour, and you’ll be part of our Live Tweet.

My thanks to BNoirDetour for graciously letting me piggy-bank (for lack of a better word) on her Twitter following. We look forward to tweeting with you this Sunday night!