Guest-hosting the #BNoirDetour film for 12/27: KISS OF DEATH

 

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This holiday season, Salome at BNoirDetour has bestowed upon me the gift of guest-hosting (for which many thanks, Salome)! The only proper response is to gift you with one of the classic films-noir, 1947’s Kiss of Death.

Victor Mature plays Nick Bianco, an imprisoned gang leader who starts spouting names to get out of prison when he finds out that his nuclear family in the “outside world” is falling apart. Unfortunately, one of the names provided by Nick is that of Tommy Udo (Richard Widmark in a hair-raising film debut). Udo does not take lightly to being double-crossed, as evidenced in a famous scene where he confronts a wheelchair-bound mother of a gang member. (No spoiler here — just hold onto something and watch.)

It’s an alternately touching and sizzling movie worthy of the BNoirDetour imprimatur, and it will be Live Tweeted at the usual time, Sunday at 9 p.m. EST. All I ask is that you “follow” me on Twitter at @MovieMovieBlogB on Sunday evening so that I can respond to your comments; you can always “unfollow” me after the Live Tweet. Happy holidays, and enjoy the movie!

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Day 1 Recap – A MOVIE GIFT TO YOU BLOGATHON

The cinematic presents are already piling up under the tree! Join us as we rattle the boxes and examine bloggers’ film choices in the

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The theme of this blogathon is special movies being gifted to special people, and our bloggers would do Santa proud! (If you have missed reading any of the blogathon entries, click on the individual blog names below to link to their entries.)

B Noir Detour wishes the modern-day film noir Bound upon the late, great noir actress Barbara Stanwyck.

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Serendipitous Anachronisms thanks her blog’s readers by gifting them with the French romantic comedy Amélie – The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain.

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Spontaneous Whimsy shares An Affair to Remember with her husband in memory of her grandmother, recounting the surprising parallels between her own life and those of the movie’s characters.

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And lastly, yours truly shares with that lucky soul, the first-time moviegoer, the valentine to movies known as Cinema Paradiso.

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Our nifty gifting blogathon still has two days to go, so keep checking back for more entries. You never know what surprises are in store!

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The ‘ONE’ OF MY ALL-TIME FAVORITE CARTOONS BLOGATHON is here!

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Sorry that our blogathon couldn’t wait for Saturday morning, but we’re so excited to talk about our favorite animated films! Join us over the next three days as a golden collection of bloggers share their favorite cartoon memories with everyone!

If you are one of the participating bloggers:

  1. Please post the names and URLs of your blog and the cartoon you are blogging about, in the “Comments” section below, so that we can link to them.
  2. The only deadline is that we request you post your blog entry by the end of the day on Sunday, Nov. 9 — and the sooner, the better. (Inquiring cartoon buffs want to know!)

If you are one of our visitors, click on the appropriate blog and/or cartoon title below to link to the blogger’s entry about said cartoon. Keep us bookmarked, as we will continue to update the list below throughout the weekend as bloggers submit their entries. This blog will also be doing end-of-the-day wrap-ups of blog entries submitted on each day.

So sit back this weekend, and enjoy a guilt-free line-up of classic cartoons on us!

Here are the blogathon entries:

Movie Movie Blog Blog – Popeye in The Spinach Overture (1935) and Tiny Toon Adventures (1990-1995)

Love Letters to Old Hollywood – Sleeping Beauty (1959) and 101 Dalmatians (1961)

BNoirDetourJessica Rabbit in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

Epileptic Moondancer – Alice in Wonderland (1951) and Rick and Morty (2013- )

Serendipitous Anachronisms – Pluto in Cold Turkey (1951)

Silver Screenings – Tex Avery’s Hollywood Steps Out (1941)

Moon in GeminiBugs Bunny and Gossamer in Hair-Raising Hare (1946) and Water, Water Every Hare (1952)

VocareMentor.com – Bugs Bunny in Rabbit Hood (1949)

The Movie Rat – Daffy Duck in Duck Amuck (1953)

The Wonderful World of Cinema – Disney Studios’ The Aristocats (1970)

365 Days 365 Classics – Chuck Jones’ High Note (1961)

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies – Mickey’s Gala Premiere (1933)

Mildred’s Fatburgers – Marc Antony and Pussyfoot in Chuck Jones’ Feed the Kitty (1952)

Movie Fan FarePorky Pig and Sylvester in Kitty Kornered (1946)

The Midnite Drive-InBugs Bunny in Hare-Way to the Stars (1958)

Let’s Go to the MoviesDisney Studios’ Aladdin (1992)

Silver ScenesDisney’s The Reluctant Dragon (1941)

Dell on MoviesTom & Jerry in Jerry’s Cousin (1951)

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THE GANGSTERS ALL HERE Live Tweet movie for Sat., Oct. 24: THE BIG COMBO (1955)

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This week, The Gangsters All Here makes a bid for legitimacy with a film-noir gem titled The Big Combo. It stars Cornel Wilde as Police Lt. Leonard Diamond, who is on a one-man quest to bring down Mr. Brown (ultra-slick Richard Conte), a racketeer who appears to control everything and everyone in town except for Lt. Diamond. The worthy supporting cast includes Helen Walker (in her final film role), Jean Wallace, and Brian Donlevy (who seems to play a slobbering syncophant in about every other one of these types of movies).

And my dear online blogger-friend Salome at BNoirDetour would never forgive me if I didn’t mention two other memorable supporting actors: Lee Van Cleef and Earl Holliman as Mr. Brown’s henchmen Fante and Mingo. When I first watched this movie, I regarded this less-than-dynamic duo as simply the movie’s answer to Of Mice and Men‘s simpletons George and Lennie. But Ms. Salome finds a fascinating homoerotic subtext to this pair’s relationship, right down to their sleeping in separate but nearby beds. You decide.

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Are you kidding? With all of the aforementioned juicy plot elements, plus a jazzy score from Laura‘s David Raksin, this movie can’t possibly get less than 5 out of 5 fannies. You’ll want to stay put right up to the movie’s final shot (which unapologetically apes, er, does a homage to a legendary film from the 1940’s). See you this Saturday!

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Day 1 recap of the SEE YOU IN THE ‘FALL’ BLOGATHON

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The autumnal equinox is still a few days away, but the autumble equinox has just begun. Welcome to the Day 1 recap of our tribute to physical comedy, the See You in the ‘Fall Blogathon! If the descriptions below whet your appetite, just click on each of the blogs’ names for terrific tributes to long and loud laughs!

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BNoirDetour gives a shot-by-shot analysis of Keenan Wynn and Whit Bissell offering brief comic relief in the otherwise heated film noir Shack Out on 101.

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Nitrate Glow discusses the chase scene of Buster Keaton’s amazing silent comedy Sherlock Jr.

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Girls Do Film details M. Hulot’s befuddlement with modern life in Jacques Tati’s Mon Oncle.

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Movies Silently explains just why grown man Lupino Lane is dressed up like a bratty kid in the silent short comedy Naughty Boy.

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Love Letters to Old Hollywood shows the lengths to which Jerry Lewis will go to get a laugh in his acclaimed comedy The Nutty Professor.

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Barbra Streisand takes Ryan O’Neal on the ride of his life, in Moon in Gemini‘s critique of the chase scene in Peter Bogdanovich’s screwball-comedy homage What’s Up, Doc?

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CineMaven offers a double feature of the no-holds-barred finale of Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles, and blind Mr. Muckle’s disastrous tour of W.C. Fields’ store in It’s a Gift.

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British situation comedy gets its due, as Serendipitous Anachronisms chronicles the price that one woman pays for “Keeping Up Appearances.”

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And lastly, your faithful correspondent shows Steve Martin gathering comedy on the fly, in his unique magical act “The Great Flydini.”

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And the fun is far from over! We still have three days left in this bungling blogathon, so keep checking back for more great entries. We’ll post another recap after all of Monday’s entries have been submitted!

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Guest-hosting a #BNoirDetour Live Tweet double feature on Sun., Sept. 13

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Holy maloney, when did I die and go to film-noir heaven? I’m as giddy as Richard Widmark pushing a wheelchair-bound woman down the stairs!

For this Sunday, the film-noir blog BNoirDetour is letting me completely handle her usual Sunday Twitter.com presentation of noir movies. She kindly let me co-host about a month ago, but this is the first time she’s given me the whole she-bang to handle. Don’t worry, though, I’m giving you a couple of memorable flicks to finish off your weekend!

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My first choice is a particularly earthy number from 1955 titled Murder Is My Beat. It stars Paul Langton as Ray Patrick, a police detective who is aboard a train to accompany Eden Lane (Barbara Payton), a convicted murderess, to prison to carry out her sentence. But during a brief layover, Eden happens to look out the window — and wouldn’t you know it, she sees the very man whom she has been convicted of murdering. Once Eden convinces Ray of this, it’s Ray’s minor task to convince the rest of the world that Eden is telling the truth.

This sounds about as far-out as noir gets, but it’s riveting all the way, in no small part to the bare-bones direction of Edgar G. Ulmer, director of the almost existential noir classic Detour. And I gotta admit, I’m a pushover for buxom blondes — and if somebody like Eden told me she’d just seen Bigfoot outside her window, I’d probably do all I could to prove her right, so I can relate to Ray’s plight.

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My second entry for the evening is 1948’s Cry of the City, starring Victor Mature as Lt. Candella, a seen-it-all cop who’s trying to nail high-profile gangster Martin Rome (Richard Conte, The Big Combo) for a jewel robbery that Rome won’t cop to. The movie starts out as a lively game of cat-and-mouse, but with a tough-as-nails screenplay by an uncredited Ben Hecht, and taut direction from noir veteran Richard Siodmak (Criss Cross), the movie evolves into an unforgettable character study of both sides of the law. This might seem a strange description, but this movie is as beautiful as film noir gets.

Join us on Twitter.com at 9 p.m. EST on Sun., Sept. 13; if you’re looking for an “anchor” Twitter account, go to mine (@MovieMovieBlogB). (If you don’t usually “follow” me on Twitter, be sure to add me so that I can read your Live Tweet comments. You can always “unfollow” me after the double feature.) Use the hashtag #BNoirDetour to follow the movies and comment on them whenever you’d like, and have a BNoir blast with us!

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POSTSCRIPT. I — Movie Movie Blog Blog, that is — would like to take this opportunity to invite the regular viewers of #BNoirDetour to follow The Gangsters All Here, my Twitter page devoted to my Saturday Live Tweets of classic-era gangster movies. If you like film-noir, you are sure to enjoy my selection of films featuring fedora, fast talkers, and Feds!

Just click on the above banner to go to my The Gangsters All Here Twitter page. Then, every Saturday at 2:30 p.m. EST, join us for a great gangster movie, and use the hashtag #GangstersAllHere to comment on the movie with your fellow Twitterers. And if you want a heads-up on the week’s movie selection, click here to visit my blog devoted to this same Live Tweet. Enjoy the movies, you mugs!

(My enthusiastic thanks goes out to Salome at BNoirDetour for letting me take over her “director’s chair” this week!)

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I’m so happy!

Join us at Twitter.com on Sunday night for a film-noir double-feature!

Join us on Twitter.com on Sun., Aug. 23, and tweet along with us as we watch — for free, online — two splendid film-noir movies: The Shanghai Gesture (1941), starring Gene Tierney and Victor Mature, and Behind Green Lights (1946), starring Carole Landis and William Gargan. Hosted by your good blogs Movie Movie Blog Blog and BNoirDetour. Click here for more information. B Noir or be square!

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